Roman Mankowsky is awarded the Reimar Lüst Grant

of the Max Planck Society for his PhD studies

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Marta Gibert receives SNSF Professorship

for her project on Functional oxide heterostructures by design.

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Q-MAC News

Superconductivity: footballs with no resistance

Superconductors have long been confined to niche applications, due to the fact that the highest temperature at which even the best of these materials becomes resistance-free is minus 70 degrees Celsius. Nowadays they are mainly used in magnets for nuclear magnetic resonance tomographs, fusion devices and particle accelerators. Q-MAC physicists from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg and the University of Oxford shone laser pulses at a material made up from potassium atoms and carbon atoms arranged in bucky ball structures. For a small fraction of a second, they found it to become superconducting at more than 100 degrees Kelvin – around minus 170 degrees Celsius. A similar effect was already discovered in 2013 by scientists of the same group in a different material, a ceramic oxide belonging to the family of so-called “cuprates”. As fullerenes have a relatively simple chemical structure, the researchers hope to be able to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of light-induced superconductivity at high temperatures through their new experiments. Such insights could help in the development of a material which conducts electricity at room temperature without losses, and without optical excitation. The results are reported online in the journal Nature.

 

For further information, please see the complete press release.

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